Design, Technology and Productivity: The Year Ahead

Originally published on BrightStarr. Like the weather, predictions tend to be… unpredictable. Instead, a better aphorism to use is what Alan Kay, pioneer of object-orientated programming and the GUI famously said: ‘the best way to predict the future is to invent it’. With that in mind, we at BrightStarr think there are three key themes that stand out this year and should help businesses large and small plan for the year ahead:...

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The 1 rule all designers should live by
Sep04

The 1 rule all designers should live by

Originally published by www.webdesignerdepot.com.

When Thomas Heatherwick’s 2012 Olympic cauldron unfolded its 204 petals on a warm summer’s evening in London during the opening ceremony, many gasped in awe. It captured brilliantly, in a moment, the optimism and human achievement that’s the core of the Olympic spirit. It was something that no-one had seen before, nor expected; unique in its boldness, arguably setting a new standard.

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Can your intranet drive innovation?

Originally published on BrightStarr. Who’s meeting the innovation challenge head-on? There is thankfully good news. Some businesses are facing up to these challenges by placing a greater emphasis on design and innovation, in the hope that it will reengineer their customers’ trust by bringing out new products and services. Barclays bank is one such example. No stranger to courting the wrong kind of press, they have become an...

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The Future of Health: Ethics and Privacy

Originally published on Cheltenham Science Festival Cheltenham Science Festival 2015 Internet of Things technologies – fitness wristbands and smart watches – are moving health from the hospital to the home. But if your watch, thermostat and games console could manage your well-being, how would you feel about being constantly monitored? Engineer Ian Craddock and social scientist Madeleine Murtagh delve into the technology and the...

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Hacking the Internet of Things

Originally published on Cheltenham Science Festival Cheltenham Science Festival 2015 If it’s connected to the internet, it’s vulnerable to cyberattacks. If that’s your computer, you probably have defences in place – but what about if it’s your fridge? Or TV, or even your children’s toys? The Internet of Things allows a revolutionary way of life, but security is lagging behind. Adrian McEwen with cybersecurity experts Sadie...

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Apple: the U2 of the tech world

Originally published on spiked. It’s official: I’m bored with Apple. Last week, the world’s most valuable company managed to delight its loyal fanbase and, at the same time, leave many others (me included) nonplussed with the launch of its new digital smartwatch and a pair of slightly bigger phones. The brand everyone else liked to copy is now becoming a market follower, no longer the market leader it once was. Some hardened Apple...

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Usability vs. innovation

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Is Social Business All Talk and No Trousers?

Measuring Inputs Rather than Outputs  If there is one thing we can be certain about, it is that many businesses appear uncertain about how to include social initiatives in their day-to-day operations. The recent NetStrategyJMC Digital Workplace Trends 2013 survey confirms this. Only one third of those surveyed have managed to align their social strategy with their business goals. Those that have successfully invested in social tools...

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Engineers, be bold – Britain needs grander designs

Co-authored with Paul Reeves. Last week the Royal Academy of Engineering published a report Jobs and growth: the importance of engineering skills to the UK economy that claimed “engineers underpin the economy” but concluded with the gloomy news that they are in short supply and that the UK does not produce enough of them to make a difference. To help make a difference, James Dyson, arguably the UK’s most high profile...

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Event: Symposium on the Big Potatoes Manifesto for Design

The symposium will feature two debates – both being central to the Manifesto themes – with a final plenary to gather overall feedback. Each debate will be introduced with a provocation made by a member of the Manifesto team. Two external speakers will challenge the points being made, with the remainder of the time given over to the audience, for a wider debate. The debates are: DEBATE#1: UPHOLDING HUMANISM – OR CENTERING ON USERS?...

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Making it in the 21st Century

The strand consists of five separate debates: Manufacturing: the great comeback?, Gas galore?, Fracking and the future of energy, Engineering design or design engineering?, Is water too cheap?, Commons people: music in a digital...

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